Tracy Bility… she once lived in our street.

The recent headlines and media focus around horsemeat finding its way onto supermarket shelves by way of the burger, has revealed tests of meals (and I won’t go into names) in some cases contained between 30% and 100% horsemeat instead of beef.

Knowing where your food comes from and how it’s prepared should be top priority. Would you buy a car without first wanting to know it’s service history and where it came from? So why should our knowledge of the food we eat be any different. It’s an old saying but ‘we are what we eat’ and nothing could be closer to the truth than recent revelations.

My understanding of a ‘ready meal‘ is when I shout from the kitchen to the children ‘it’s ready’, not pulling a frozen packet from the freezer. In fact we don’t own a freezer, the days of UFO’s (unidentifiable frozen objects) has since long gone. The result?… we eat better, waste less. However, time constraints don’t always allow for such planning, so freezing your food isn’t the real issue, only traceability of its contents. So what do we mean by traceability? Traceability is defined in the General Food Law Regulation 178/2002 as:

‘The ability to trace and follow a food, feed, food producing animal or substance…through all stages of production, processing and distribution’. Farmers’ markets are all about traceability

Most farmers’ market organisations set their own policies, geographic boundaries, and methods of enforcing rules that ensure their integrity. Market managers, in many cases, require proof of insurance hygiene certificates and copies of all relevant accreditation documents.

Barnard Castle Farmers’ Market is currently run by stallholder and community volunteers and you can be certain we will continue to maintain our own high standards for safe food handling, traceability and general excellence. We will also continue to set the standard for direct communications between producers and our customers.

Our list of 2013 Farmers’ Markets and Roadshows with funding from ‘Local Food,’ will be published on our website over the next few days. This is a programme supported by the Big Lottery, which provides funding for projects working to make local food more accessible and affordable to communities.

Happy, eating and see you at the next market, where we will have a live food demonstration… ‘no horsing around’ , but before I go, I can’t resist sharing a little joke…

“A supermarket burger walks into a bar. “Pint please”. “I can’t hear you” says the barman. “Sorry” replies the burger. “I’m a little bit horse”.

 

 

 

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